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Gone With the Wind

From the beginning of Civil War to Atlanta burning to the political aftermath of the Emancipation Proclamation and the Reconstruction era, Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind depicts a society thorn asunder by war.

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Civil Disobedience

There is a lot to understand and learn from this pamphlet-sized essay. Thoreau’s ‘Civil Disobedience’ is an abstract text with equally abstract concepts and best read with an open and critical mind.

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The Memory Police

Published in 1994 and translated by Stephen Snyder, Yoko Ogawa’s The Memory Police is a quiet allegory and meditation on life as well as a dystopian fable about fascism. The story is set in an unnamed island where things disappear—birds, perfume, roses. Most disappearances happen overnight. The inhabitants wake up in a form of daze, […]

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Monster, She Wrote

Authors Lisa Kroger and Melanie Anderson’s Monster, She Wrote: The Women Who Pioneered Horror and Speculative Fiction highlights female writers who have greatly contributed to the horror genre since its inception.

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Circe

Countless writers have taken inspirations from characters in Greek Mythology for their quintessential characterizations everyone could easily recognize. Written in first-person narrative, Madeline Miller’s Circe follows the life of its titular protagonist as she navigates the world around her.

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Snowblind

There is something beautiful and eerie with the wintry landscape of Iceland, which is why it’s a perfect place to set a murder mystery. In Ragnar Jonasson’s debut, Snowblind, he takes you to the isolated, small fishing town north of Reykjavik.

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The Satapur Moonstone

Sujata Massey followed her Edgar Award finalist book, The Widows of Malabar Hill (2018), with another captivating mystery featuring the female Bombay lawyer, Perveen Mistry. Set in 1922, in a remote state of Satapur, a tragedy has befallen the royal family when the maharaja suddenly dies. Jiva Rao, the maharaja’s ten-year old son, finds himself […]

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We

Even though the term dystopian was first coined in the 1740s by historian George Claeys, dystopian fiction novels did not become fully defined until the turn of the twentieth century. Written in 1921, Yevgeny Zamyatin’s social satire We laid the foundations for the genre that is now ubiquitous: dystopian fiction. Zamyatin’s We imagines a future […]

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Diary of a Murderer

Kim Young-ha is an acclaimed writer in Korea. His works have been translated into English and other languages. Diary of a Murderer is a collection of four short stories ranging from suspenseful thrillers to ruminative explorations of human nature. The book opens with a thrilling titular story about a seventy-year old man, Kim Byeongsu, who […]

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Milkman

Winner of the 2018 Man Booker Prize and 2019 National Book Critics Award for Fiction, Anna Burns’ Milkman follows the story of an eighteen-year old unnamed narrator, exploring what her life is like in a community living under oppression and divided by conflict. Even though Anna Burns did not specify where and when the novel […]

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The Dry

When I feel like reading an atmospheric and gritty crime fiction novel, my mind takes me to the cold and snowy landscape that is Scandinavian or Nordic noir. Jane Harper’s gripping debut novel, The Dry, shows that the heat of the Australian outback is as good place as any for a good mystery story. Set […]

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Pachinko

“History has failed us, but no matter” is the opening line of Min Jin Lee’s novel Pachinko. This sweeping, historical, and immersive family saga delves deeply into the experiences of Korean immigrants in Japan between 1910 and 1989. The story begins in a small fishing village in Yeongdo, Korea. There, we are introduced to fishermen, […]